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DTIC ADA565888: Addressing Army Aviation Collective Training Challenges with Simulators and Simulations Capabilities

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA565888...
As the U.S. Army continues development of a Live-Virtual-Constructive Integrated Training Environment, the reliance on aviation simulators and simulations will take on more importance in the overall aviation collective training mission. Consequently, refinement of requirements for simulation and simulator capabilities and their effective utilization are essential. The primary objective of the research reported here was to identify Army aviation collective training challenges and to compare those needs to current (and planned) collective simulation capabilities. The specific gaps among collective training challenges, simulation capabilities, and simulation utilization can be used to inform simulation development and to guide training development. Based on the findings, a simulation-training analysis tool was developed that maps the training challenges to simulation-training resources. The resulting analysis tool facilitates data-driven recommendations for maximizing use of current and planned simulations-training resources to meet key training challenges. Overall, the findings suggested that while current simulation-training resources address many training challenges, some capability gaps exist, and there are multiple opportunities to increase the effective utilization of simulation-training resources given current capabilities.
Published on 09/03/2018
Document details: 114 pages. 5 downloads.

DTIC ADA464703: NATO's Prague Capabilities Commitment

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA464703...
With the end of the Cold War, NATO began to reassess its collective defense strategy and to anticipate possible new missions. The conflicts in the Balkans highlighted the need for more mobile forces, for technological equality between the United States and its allies, and for interoperability. In 1999, NATO launched the Defense Capabilities Initiative (DCI), an effort to enable the alliance to deploy troops quickly to crisis regions, to supply and protect those forces, and to equip then to engage an adversary effectively. The conflict in Afghanistan marked a new development in modern warfare through the extensive use of precision-guided munitions, directed by ground-based special forces; many believe that this step widened the capabilities breach between the United States and its European allies. At its 2002 summit in Prague, NATO approved a new initiative, the Prague Capabilities Commitment (PCC), touted as a slimmed-down, more focused DCI, with quantifiable goals. Analysts have cautioned that the success of PCC will hinge upon increased spending and changed procurement priorities particularly by the European allies. At NATO's 2004 Istanbul summit and its 2006 Riga summit, the alliance reaffirmed the goals of PCC and, in light of NATO missions, particularly in Afghanistan, stressed the urgency of acquiring specific capabilities such as airlift. During the 100th Congress, lawmakers are likely to review the alliance's progress in boosting NATO capabilities, especially in the context of the appropriations process. This report will be updated as events warrant. See also CRS Report RS22529, The NATO Summit at Riga, 2006, by Paul Gallis.
Published on 06/09/2018
Document details: 7 pages. 6 downloads.

DTIC ADA485862: NATO's Prague Capabilities Commitment

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA485862...
With the end of the Cold War, NATO began to reassess its collective defense strategy and to anticipate possible new missions. The conflicts in the Balkans highlighted the need for more mobile forces, for greater technological equality between the United States and its allies, and for interoperability. In 1999, NATO launched the Defense Capabilities Initiative (DCI), an effort to enable the alliance to deploy troops quickly to crisis regions, to supply and protect those forces, and to equip them to engage an adversary effectively. At its 2002 summit, NATO approved a new initiative, the Prague Capabilities Commitment (PCC), touted as a slimmed-down, more focused DCI, with quantifiable goals. Analysts cautioned that the success of PCC would hinge upon increased spending and changed procurement priorities, particularly by the European allies. At NATO's 2004 Istanbul summit and its 2006 Riga summit, the alliance reaffirmed the goals of PCC. The 2008 Bucharest summit declaration did not mention PCC, but, in light of NATO missions, particularly in Afghanistan, stressed the urgency of acquiring specific capabilities such as airlift and communications. Congress may review the alliance's progress in boosting NATO capabilities. This report will not be updated. See also CRS Report RS22529, The NATO Summit at Riga, 2006.
Published on 06/24/2018
Document details: 7 pages. 3 downloads.

DTIC ADA485865: NATO's Prague Capabilities Commitment

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA485865...
With the end of the Cold War, NATO began to reassess its collective defense strategy and to anticipate possible new missions. The conflicts in the Balkans highlighted the need for more mobile forces, for technological equality between the United States and its allies, and for interoperability. In 1999, NATO launched the Defense Capabilities Initiative (DCI), an effort to enable the alliance to deploy troops quickly to crisis regions, to supply and protect those forces, and to equip them to engage an adversary effectively. To meet the DCI's goals, however, most allied countries needed to increase their individual defense budgets, a step many were reluctant to take. The war in Afghanistan marked a new development in modern warfare through the extensive use of precision-guided munitions directed by ground-based special forces; many believe that this step widened the capabilities breach between the United States and its European allies. At its November 2002 summit in Prague, NATO approved a new initiative, the Prague Capabilities Commitment (PCC), touted as a slimmed-down, more focused DCI, with quantifiable goals. Analysts have cautioned that the success of PCC will hinge upon increased spending and changed procurement priorities -- particularly by the European allies. During the second session of the 109th Congress, law makers are likely to review the alliance's progress in achieving PCC's goals. This report will be updated periodically. See also CRS Report RS21354, The NATO Summit at Prague, 2002, by Paul Gallis.
Published on 06/24/2018
Document details: 7 pages. 2 downloads.

DTIC ADA561265: Targeted NextGen Capabilities for 2025

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA561265...
Under Vision 100 Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act (P.L. 108-176), the Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) was charged with creating an integrated plan for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The focus of the legislative mandate was to leverage existing technologies and align the research and development (R&D) needed to transform our nation's air transportation system. In this context, the JPDO was established to manage the public and private collaborative work related to NextGen. The JPDO coordinates the NextGen efforts of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Departments of Transportation (DOT), Defense (DOD), Commerce (DOC), and Homeland Security (DHS), and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The JPDO also has access to subject matter expertise from industry and academia through the NextGen Institute. The purpose of this document is to focus research and system implementation investment decisions by identifying the NextGen elements that can be achieved by 2025. These elements will need to be consistent with available resources, national priorities, and technology developments. This document also provides a baseline for the JPDO to engage its industry, labor, academia, and government partners in defining the goals and targets of performance metrics as a way of refining research priorities. In addition, it provides a basis to update JPDO planning tools, namely the NextGen Concept of Operations (ConOps), the Enterprise Architecture (EA), and the Integrated Work Plan (IWP). These planning tools are used to articulate the NextGen vision and coordinate its supporting efforts. Ultimately, this document was created to involve the NextGen community in maturing our collective understanding of 2025 and beyond, and is part of an ongoing vetting process to clarify the NextGen vision.
Published on 09/02/2018
Document details: 37 pages. 6 downloads.

DTIC ADA528434: Transforming NATO Defense Capabilities

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA528434...
The transatlantic relationship created by the Washington Treaty of 1949 has been uniquely enduring and successful in warding off common dangers. However, this achievement has resulted in a new era that cannot be characterized in bipolar terms. Ethnic conflict, political instability, and territorial disputes are mounting around the NATO periphery. We face a proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, increases in the lethality of terrorism, non-state sponsored adventurism, and other asymmetric challenges. These dangers have forced us to reconsider the definitions of peace, territorial integrity, and security--concepts that are the raison d'etre of the Alliance. NATO accepts the fact that it must change to remain as relevant as it has been for 50 years. Politically, programs such as the Founding Act with Russia, a distinct relationship with Ukraine, the Mediterranean Dialogue, and the Partnership for Peace program evidence this development and extend transparency to the east and south. The most discernible new mission is the assumption of peacekeeping responsibilities as leader of Implementation and Stabilization Force. Bosnia has been a success in both humanitarian and geopolitical terms and demonstrated that the transformation of the Alliance from a fixed defense posture to flexible mobile operations is well underway. NATO force levels have been reduced by 35 percent and shifted from high-readiness, forward-deployed heavy units to a mix of lower-readiness and core rapid reaction forces. Significant progress also is being made in doctrine, organization, and technology to ensure that NATO forces can serve as an effective crisis management tool whenever the collective interest of the allies is threatened.
Published on 08/02/2018
Document details: 6 pages. 8 downloads.

DTIC ADA415999: Exploiting FBCB2 Capabilities Through Realistic Feedback

www.archive.org/details/DTIC_ADA415999...
This report describes the development of a proficiency measurement architecture for the Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2). It first explores primary dimensions of FBCB2-enabled performance-high-priority system capabilities, user digital skills and tasks, and network management skills. It then examines key factors that influence digital performance, including echelon, mission phase, unit standing operating procedures, task difficulty, and common performance problems. Finally, it discusses measurement implications of digitization, a comprehensive framework for presenting observation guidelines, and implications for FBCB2-focused. After Action Reviews (AAR). The collective findings establish a basic architecture for measuring high-payoff proficiency targets, enhancing performance feedback capabilities, and optimizing the benefits of digital training programs. Two practical tools will help leaders and trainers focus on FBCB2-enabled skills that contribute significantly to combat effectiveness. Key recommendations for expanding the architecture and knowledge base are included.
Published on 05/13/2018
Document details: 56 pages. 8 downloads.

Collective Energy Foraging of Robot Swarms and Robot Organisms

www.archive.org/details/arxiv-1111.0873...
Cooperation and competition among stand-alone swarm agents increase collective fitness of the whole system. A principally new kind of collective systems is demonstrated by some bacteria and fungi, when they build symbiotic organisms. Symbiotic life forms emerge new functional and self-developmental capabilities, which allow better survival of swarm agents in different environments. In this paper we consider energy foraging scenario for two robotic species, swarm robots and symbiotic robot organism. It is indicated that aggregation of microrobots into a robot organism can provide better functional fitness for the whole group. A prototype of microrobots capable of autonomous aggregation and disaggregation are shown.
Published on 09/23/2013
Document details: 56 pages. 31 downloads.

A measure of individual role in collective dynamics

www.archive.org/details/arxiv-1002.4042...
Identifying key players in collective dynamics remains a challenge in several research fields, from the efficient dissemination of ideas to drug target discovery in biomedical problems. The difficulty lies at several levels: how to single out the role of individual elements in such intermingled systems, or which is the best way to quantify their importance. Centrality measures describe a node's importance by its position in a network. The key issue obviated is that the contribution of a node to the collective behavior is not uniquely determined by the structure of the system but it is a result of the interplay between dynamics and network structure. We show that dynamical influence measures explicitly how strongly a node's dynamical state affects collective behavior. For critical spreading, dynamical influence targets nodes according to their spreading capabilities. For diffusive processes it quantifies how efficiently real systems may be controlled by manipulating a single node.
Published on 09/20/2013
Document details: 56 pages. 49 downloads.

A measure of individual role in collective dynamics.

www.archive.org/details/pubmed-PMC3289910...
This article is from Scientific Reports , volume 2 . Abstract Identifying key players in collective dynamics remains a challenge in several research fields, from the efficient dissemination of ideas to drug target discovery in biomedical problems. The difficulty lies at several levels: how to single out the role of individual elements in such intermingled systems, or which is the best way to quantify their importance. Centrality measures describe a node's importance by its position in a network. The key issue obviated is that the contribution of a node to the collective behavior is not uniquely determined by the structure of the system but it is a result of the interplay between dynamics and network structure. We show that dynamical influence measures explicitly how strongly a node's dynamical state affects collective behavior. For critical spreading, dynamical influence targets nodes according to their spreading capabilities. For diffusive processes it quantifies how efficiently real systems may be controlled by manipulating a single node.
Published on 10/28/2014
Document details: 56 pages. 33 downloads.
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