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Animal Welfare & Anti-vivisection 1870-1910: Frances Power Cobbe

books.google.com/books?id=cjViv-ut0zQC&dq=anti-vivise...
This set brings together a range of documents that will allow researchers to explore the nineteenth- century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement.
Published by Taylor & Francis on 06/18/2019
Book details: 456 pages.

Anti-Vivisection and the Profession of Medicine in Britain

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=HxsuDwAAQBAJ&...
This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This book explores the social history of the anti-vivisection movement in Britain from its nineteenth-century beginnings until the 1960s. It discusses the ethical principles that inspired the movement and the socio-political background that explains its rise and fall. Opposition to vivisection began when medical practitioners complained it was contrary to the compassionate ethos of their profession. Christian anti-cruelty organizations took up the cause out of concern that callousness among the professional classes would have a demoralizing effect on the rest of society. As the nineteenth century drew to a close, the influence of transcendentalism, Eastern religions and the spiritual revival led new age social reformers to champion a more holistic approach to science, and dismiss reliance on vivisection as a materialistic oversimplification. In response, scientists claimed it was necessary to remain objective and unemotional in order to perform the experiments necessary for medical progress.
Author: A.W.H. Bates
Published by Springer on 07/24/2017
Book details: 217 pages.

Antivivisection and Medical Science in Victorian Society

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=rGuLDwAAQBAJ&...
Late nineteenth-century England witnessed the emergence of a vociferous and well-organzied movement against the use of living animals in scientific research, a protest that threatened the existence of experimental medicine. Richard D. French views the Victorian antivivisection movement as a revealing case study in the attitude of modern society toward science. The author draws on popular pamphlets and newspaper accounts to recreate the structure, tactics, ideology, and personalities of the early antivivisection movement. He argues that at the heart of the antivivisection movement was public concern over the emergence of science and medicine as leading institutions of Victorian society--a concern, he suggests, that has its own contemporary counterparts. In addition to providing a social and cultural history of the Victorian antivivisection movement, the book sheds light on many related areas, including Victorian political and administrative history, the political sociology of scientific communities, social reform and voluntary associations, the psychoanalysis of human attitudes toward animals, and Victorian feminism. Richard D. French is a Science Advisor with the Science Council of Canada. Originally published in 1975. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Published by Princeton University Press on 03/12/2019
Book details: 440 pages.

Anti-Vivisection and the Profession of Medicine in Britain

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=HxsuDwAAQBAJ&...
This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This book explores the social history of the anti-vivisection movement in Britain from its nineteenth-century beginnings until the 1960s. It discusses the ethical principles that inspired the movement and the socio-political background that explains its rise and fall. Opposition to vivisection began when medical practitioners complained it was contrary to the compassionate ethos of their profession. Christian anti-cruelty organizations took up the cause out of concern that callousness among the professional classes would have a demoralizing effect on the rest of society. As the nineteenth century drew to a close, the influence of transcendentalism, Eastern religions and the spiritual revival led new age social reformers to champion a more holistic approach to science, and dismiss reliance on vivisection as a materialistic oversimplification. In response, scientists claimed it was necessary to remain objective and unemotional in order to perform the experiments necessary for medical progress.
Author: A.W.H. Bates
Published by Springer on 07/24/2017
Book details: 217 pages.

Animal Welfare & Anti-vivisection 1870-1910: Pro-vivisection writings

books.google.com/books?id=NoF16oyRzcsC&dq=anti-vivise...
This set brings together a range of documents that will allow researchers to explore the nineteenth- century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement.
Published by Taylor & Francis on 06/18/2019
Book details: 217 pages.

The New England Anti-Vivisection Society Monthly ...

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=BCwyAQAAMAAJ&...
Published on 06/18/1898
Book details: 217 pages.

Animal Welfare & Anti-vivisection 1870-1910: Anti-vivisection writings

books.google.com/books?id=9EnHrJPnPfgC&dq=anti-vivise...
This three-volume set brings together a range of documents that allows researchers to explore the nineteenth-century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement. The collection maps the battle over the meaning of animals in Victorian culture, from utility to companionship, showing the range of political, rhetorical and representational strategies that were deployed as physiology and anti-vivisection struggled to assert the 'truth' of animal bodies. The volumes include press articles by key pro- and anti-vivisectionist activists in the established press, Victorian government materials, scientific papers and illustrations, and the pamphlets and journals of the anti-vivisectionist movements. Recent collections in this series include Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns (March 2003, 5 volumes, £495) and Women, Madness and Spiritualism (June 2003, 2 volumes, £250). Forthcoming titles include Women and Cross Dressing 1800-1939 (2005, 3 volumes, c. £325) and Feminism and the Periodical Press 1900-1918 (2005, 3 volumes, c. £325).
Published by Taylor & Francis on 06/18/2019
Book details: 1144 pages.

The Anti-vivisectionist

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=7qIOAAAAQAAJ&...
Published on 06/18/1880
Book details: 1144 pages.

The Heart of the Anti-vivisectionist

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=6XRdwOzkhJcC&...
Published on 06/18/2019
Book details: 46 pages.

Antivivisection and Medical Science in Victorian Society

books.google.com/books?id=WVmYDwAAQBAJ&dq=anti-vivise...
Late nineteenth-century England witnessed the emergence of a vociferous and well-organzied movement against the use of living animals in scientific research, a protest that threatened the existence of experimental medicine. Richard D. French views the Victorian antivivisection movement as a revealing case study in the attitude of modern society toward science. The author draws on popular pamphlets and newspaper accounts to recreate the structure, tactics, ideology, and personalities of the early antivivisection movement. He argues that at the heart of the antivivisection movement was public concern over the emergence of science and medicine as leading institutions of Victorian society--a concern, he suggests, that has its own contemporary counterparts. In addition to providing a social and cultural history of the Victorian antivivisection movement, the book sheds light on many related areas, including Victorian political and administrative history, the political sociology of scientific communities, social reform and voluntary associations, the psychoanalysis of human attitudes toward animals, and Victorian feminism. Richard D. French is a Science Advisor with the Science Council of Canada. Originally published in 1975. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Published by Princeton University Press on 03/12/2019
Book details: 440 pages.
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