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The Science Book

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=Z4eKBgAAQBAJ&...
The Science Book explores how scientists have sought to explain our world and the universe, and how scientific discoveries have been made. A new title in DK's successful "Big Ideas, Simply Explained" series, this book on science and the history of science looks at topics such as why Copernicus's ideas were contentious, how Galileo worked out his theories on motion and inertia, and what the discovery of DNA meant. The Science Book covers every area of science--astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, math, and physics, and brings the greatest scientific ideas to life with fascinating text, quirky graphics, and pithy quotes.
Author: DK
Published by Penguin on 02/02/2015
Book details: 352 pages.

The Neuroscience of Addiction

books.google.com/books?id=lVqHDwAAQBAJ&dq=Science&hl=...
Combines classic theories with current neuroscientific studies to explain the addiction cycle, focusing on neuroimaging studies and applications.
Published by Cambridge University Press on 03/14/2019
Book details: 240 pages.

A Short History of Nearly Everything

books.google.com/books?id=_CWlKRYLbIwC&dq=Science&hl=...
One of the world’s most beloved and bestselling writers takes his ultimate journey -- into the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer. In A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson trekked the Appalachian Trail -- well, most of it. In In A Sunburned Country, he confronted some of the most lethal wildlife Australia has to offer. Now, in his biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand -- and, if possible, answer -- the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining. From the Hardcover edition.
Author: Bill Bryson
Published by Anchor Canada on 05/15/2012
Book details: 624 pages.

The Sciencebook

books.google.com/books?id=Tpst6fsuvZ0C&dq=Science&hl=...
Natural phenomena, revolutionary inventions, scientific facts, and the most up-to-date questions are all explained in detailed text that is complemented by visually arresting graphics. Six major sections are further broken down into subsections that encompass everything from microscopic life to nuclear power.
Published by National Geographic Books on 08/16/2011
Book details: 431 pages.

Science in the 20th Century and Beyond

books.google.com/books?id=e2TrhBB_4fYC&dq=Science&hl=...
Surveying modern developments in science from 1900 to the present day, this fascinating volume explores Einstein's new physics, the Manhattan Project, eugenics, biotechnology, the Human Genome Project and much more.
Author: Jon Agar
Published by Polity on 04/09/2012
Book details: 614 pages.

Bad Science

books.google.com/books?id=znCisNI4c8MC&dq=Science&hl=...
The informative and witty expose of the "bad science" we are all subjected to, called "one of the essential reads of the year" by New Scientist. We are obsessed with our health. And yet — from the media's "world-expert microbiologist" with a mail-order Ph.D. in his garden shed laboratory, and via multiple health scares and miracle cures — we are constantly bombarded with inaccurate, contradictory, and sometimes even misleading information. Until now. Ben Goldacre masterfully dismantles the questionable science behind some of the great drug trials, court cases, and missed opportunities of our time, but he also goes further: out of the bullshit, he shows us the fascinating story of how we know what we know, and gives us the tools to uncover bad science for ourselves. From the Hardcover edition.
Author: Ben Goldacre
Published by McClelland & Stewart on 10/12/2010
Book details: 304 pages.

Women in Science

books.google.com/books?id=jyqJDAAAQBAJ&dq=Science&hl=...
A charmingly illustrated gift book profiling 50 famous women scientists from the ancient Greek mathematician, philosopher, and astronomer, Hypatia, to Marie Curie, a physicist and chemist.
Published on 06/25/2019
Book details: 127 pages.

Science

books.google.com/books?id=cGaGVMYaRLsC&dq=Science&hl=...
In Science, Patricia Fara rewrites science's past to provide new ways of understanding and questioning our modern technological society. Aiming not just to provide information but to make people think, this unique book explores how science has become so powerful by describing the financial interests and imperial ambitions behind its success. Sweeping through the centuries from ancient Babylon right up to the latest hi-tech experiments in genetics and particle physics, Fara's book also ranges internationally, challenging notions of European superiority by emphasising the importance of scientific projects based around the world, including revealing discussions of China and the Islamic Empire alongside the more familiar stories about Copernicus's sun-centered astronomy, Newton's gravity, and Darwin's theory of evolution. We see for instance how Muslim leaders encouraged science by building massive libraries, hospitals, and astronomical observatories and we rediscover the significance of medieval Europe--long overlooked--where, surprisingly, religious institutions ensured science's survival, as the learning preserved in monasteries was subsequently developed in new and unique institutions: universities. Instead of focussing on esoteric experiments and abstract theories, she explains how science belongs to the practical world of war, politics and business. And rather than glorifying scientists as idealized heroes, she tells true stories about real people--men (and some women) who needed to earn their living, who made mistakes, and who trampled down their rivals. Finally, this provocative volume challenges scientific supremacy itself, arguing that science is successful not because it is always indubitably right, but because people have said that it is right. Science dominates modern life, but perhaps the globe will be better off by limiting science's powers and undoing some of its effects. "Dismantling popular myths, taking a truly global view and dispensing with false idols, Fara's highly readable survey of science's histories is a breath of fresh air. She unerringly pinpoints the defining moods of each age, treating the past with respect and the present with discernment. This wonderfully literate book tells a story that is far, far more interesting than the tidy fictions of hindsight." -- Philip Ball, Consultant Editor of Nature "It's been a very long time since any reputable historian of science had the desire, the knowledge, or the nerve to undertake a book like this-- an attempt to survey the development of science from Antiquity to the present, notably including non-European materials. Patricia Fara has succeeded: Science is an elegant and compact creative synthesis of the piecemeal researches of generations of academic historians. It deserves the widest possible readership." - Steven Shapin, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard, and author of The Scientific Revolution Patricia Fara lectures in the History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge and is the Senior Tutor of Clare College. She is the author of numerous books, including Fatal Attraction: Magnetic Mysteries of the Enlightenment and Newton: The Making of Genius. Her writing has appeared in History Today, New Scientist, Nature, The Times and New Statesman, and she writes a regular column on scientific portraits for Endeavour. Books by the same author Fatal Attraction: Magnetic Mysteries of the Enlightenment by Patricia Fara. Published: 2005 Publisher: Icon Books Price: L9.99 Pandora's Breeches: Women, Science and Power in the Enlightenment by Patricia Fara. Published: 2004 Publisher: Pimlico Price: L12.99 Sex, Botany and Empire; the Stories of Carl Linnaeus and Joseph Banks by Patricia Fara. Published: 2003 Publisher: Icon Books Price: L6.99 Newton: the Making of Genius by Patricia Fara. Published: 2002 Publisher: Macmillan Price: L20 An Entertainment for Angels: Electricity in the Enlightenment by Patricia Fara. Publish
Published by Oxford University Press, USA on 06/25/2019
Book details: 408 pages.

Science in Action

books.google.com/books?id=sC4bk4DZXTQC&dq=Science&hl=...
From weaker to stronger rhetoric : literature - Laboratories - From weak points to strongholds : machines - Insiders out - From short to longer networks : tribunals of reason - Centres of calculation.
Author: Bruno Latour
Published by Harvard University Press on 06/25/1987
Book details: 274 pages.

Critical Problems in the History of Science

books.google.com/books?id=WboPReSZ668C&dq=Science&hl=...
Published by Univ of Wisconsin Press on 06/25/1969
Book details: 560 pages.
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