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Revolutionary Chestertown

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/revolutionary-chestertown-2...
Calls for independence shook the wealthy gentry with their grand mansions in Chestertown and their patchwork of prosperous Kent County plantations and farms. It was in the interest of the upper echelons of Kent County society to remain loyal to the Crown. Yet the Revolutionary spirit did ignite, as Chestertown protested parliament's duty on tea and sent flour to aid the poor in the closed port of Boston. While militia was raised, Kent County's true value to Washington was as a key breadbasket for his Continental army. Still, the revolutionaries found it difficult to gain a firm foothold. Religious and social tensions created a charged atmosphere as Loyalists burned rebel mills to the ground only to be in turn attacked by rebel mobs. Author Theodore Corbett unravels the complexities of a community thrust into war.

Revolutionary Chestertown

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/revolutionary-chestertown-1...
Calls for independence shook the wealthy gentry with their grand mansions in Chestertown and their patchwork of prosperous Kent County plantations and farms. It was in the interest of the upper echelons of Kent County society to remain loyal to the C

Revolutionary New Castle

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Though New Castle did not see any battles during the American Revolution, it was the Delaware's Colonial capital, and at it was at the center of the rebellion in the state. Its village green, still present today, served as a venue for early forums where colonists aired their grievances with the British government. Though it was considered more radical and inclined towards rebellion than the rest of Delaware, the city was also home to a sizable Loyalist community. When the city was occupied by the British in 1777, Loyalists from other colonies flocked to the relative safety of the city. However, after their departure, New Castle was still plagued by "refugees" who were essentially Loyalist privateers that preyed on the coastal communities of the Delaware Bay. Historian Ted Corbett charts the history of this community in its days leading up to the Revolution, through the conflict and into the early years of the Republic when Delaware struggled to set up its new government.

Revolutionary New Castle

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/revolutionary-new-castle-1...
Though New Castle did not see any battles during the American Revolution, it was the Delaware's Colonial capital, and at it was at the center of the rebellion in the state. Its village green, still present today, served as a venue for early forums wh

St. Augustine Pirates and Privateers

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Entrenched on Florida's Atlantic Coast since the sixteenth century, the Spanish presidio of St. Augustine was a prime target for piracy. For the colonial governors of Great Britain, France and Spain, privateering-and its rogue form, piracy-was a type of warfare used to enhance the limited resources of their colonies. While the citizens of St. Augustine were victims of this guerrilla war, they also struck back at their enemies using privateers such as Francisco Menendez, whose attacks on British ships strengthened his reputation and sustained the city. Historian Theodore Corbett recounts this dark and turbulent history, from the first sacking of the city by Francis Drake, through the pirate raids of the 1680s to the height of St. Augustine's privateering in the eighteenth century.

St. Augustine Pirates and Privateers

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/st-augustine-pirates-and-pr...
Entrenched on Florida's Atlantic Coast since the sixteenth century, the Spanish presidio of St. Augustine was a prime target for piracy. For the colonial governors of Great Britain, France and Spain, privateering-and its rogue form, piracy-was a type

The Cambridge Medieval History - Book VIII

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The Arabs first invaded Asia Minor during the commotions of 641. In 642 a plan of Valentine for a combined attack on them was frustrated by his defeat; but Theodore and Procopius penetrated as far as Batnae, and an Armenian force occupied Amida an

No Turning Point

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The Battle of Saratoga in 1777 ended with British general John Burgoyne's troops surrendering to the American rebel army commanded by General Horatio Gates. Historians have long seen Burgoyne's defeat as a turning point in the American Revolution

The Cambridge Medieval History - Book XII

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THE term Viking is a derivative of the Old Norse Vik, a creek, bay or fiord, and means one who haunts such an opening and uses it as a base whence raids may be made on the surrounding country. The word is now commonly applied to those Norsemen, Danes and Swedes who harried Europe from the eighth to the eleventh centuries, and in such phrases as 'the Viking age', 'Viking civilization', is used in a still wider sense as a convenient term for Scandinavian civilization at a particular stage in its development. It is in this larger sense that the term is used in the present chapter, covering the activities of the Northmen in peace as well as in war. The term Viking in its narrower sense is no more descriptive of this age than 'Buccaneering' would be of the age of Elizabeth. Except along the narrow line of the Eider, Scandinavia has no land-boundaries of importance and is naturally severed from the rest of Europe. Though known to Greek and Roman geographers and historians, it was almost entirely unaffected by Roman civilization. It was not till the Scandinavian peoples were driven by stress of circumstance to find fresh homes, that they found that the sea instead of dividing them from the rest of Europe really furnished them with a ready and easy path of attack against those nations of North-West Europe who had either neglected or forgotten the art of seamanship. The history of the Teutonic North from the middle of the sixth to the end of the eighth century is almost a blank, at least in so far as history concerns itself with the record of definite events. During the first half of the sixth century there had been considerable activity in Denmark and Southern Sweden. About the year 520 Chocilaicus, King of the Danes, or, according to another authority, of the Getae (i.e. Götar) in South Sweden, made a raid on the territory of the Franks on the Lower Rhine, but was defeated and slain by Theudibert, son of the Frankish king Theodoric, as he was withdrawing from Frisia with ext

The Cambridge Medieval History - Book VIII

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The Arabs first invaded Asia Minor during the commotions of 641. In 642 a plan of Valentine for a combined attack on them was frustrated by his defeat; but Theodore and Procopius penetrated as far as Batnae, and an Armenian force occupied Amida and nearly reached Edessa before they were routed. In 643, Valentine having returned to Constantinople, the enemy again entered Asia Minor, and Arabissus capitulated to Umair. In 644 Muawiya, amir of Syria, took and plundered Euchaita; and in 646 after besieging Caesarea for ten days he ravaged the neighbourhood, returned, and forced it to pay tribute, afterwards vainly attacking Amorium. On this expedition he found the Cilician fortresses deserted and left garrisons in them till his return, but in 647 had them destroyed. In 649 Habib, and in 651 Busr, raided Isauria, and in 651 Sufyan also invaded Roman territory from Germanicea, while in 649 Muawiya placed a fleet on the sea and plundered Constantia in Cyprus, but retreated on the approach of a Roman fleet under Cacorizus the chamberlain. These were only plundering expeditions: but about 647 Habib occupied Melitene, Sozopetra, and Adata; and, as the war had gone against the Romans, Constans in 651 sent Procopius to treat for peace with Muawiya (the Caliph Othman was ignored), and a truce was made for two years, the Emperor paying tribute and leaving Gregory, the nephew of Heraclius, as a hostage. The truce of 651 was hardly more than nominal; for the secession of Armenia led to the Emperor's expedition to that country (652) and to the outbreak of fresh hostilities there, and after the expiration of the armistice the war was renewed on a larger scale than before. Great preparations were made by Mudawiya for an attack by sea and land upon Constantinople. He himself, starting from Melitene, took Ancyra and advanced to Dorylaeum (653), destroying all the fortresses on the way. Meanwhile ships were being hastily built at Alexandria, Tripolis, and other places; and in 654 a fleet u
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