Herbert Bolton PDF: 1 to 8 of 8 results fetched - page 1 [kb]

Zoolz is the only cloud solution that keeps your data even when you disconnect your drives
Get full control over PDFs. Edit, combine, transform and organize PDFs.

Herbert Eugene Bolton

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/herbert-eugene-bolton...
This definitive biography offers a new critical assessment of the life, works, and ideas of Herbert E. Bolton (1870-1953), a leading historian of the American West, Mexico, and Latin America. Bolton, a famous pupil of Frederick Jackson Turner, for

Coronado

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/coronado-8...
Herbert Eugene Bolton's classic of southwestern history, first published in 1949, delivers the epic account of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado's sixteenth-century entrada to the North American frontier of the Spanish Empire. Leaving Mexico City in 1

The Colonization of North America

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-colonization-of-north-a...
The book is divided into three main parts: I. The Founding of the Colonies; II. Expansion and International Conflict; III. The Revolt of the English Colonies. The keynote is expansion. The spread of civilization in America has been presented again

The Colonization of North America

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-colonization-of-north-a...
This book represents an attempt to bring into one account the story of European expansion in North America down to 1783. The authors wrote this book in response to a clear demand for a text written from the standpoint of North America as a whole,

The Spanish Borderlands

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-spanish-borderlands...
Herbert E. Bolton (1870-1953) was a distinguished historian who received a bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin and a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1899. He was a Harrison Fellow while at Pennsylvania. Bolton quickly became

The Colonization of North America

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-colonization-of-north-a...
The book is divided into three main parts: I. The Founding of the Colonies; II. Expansion and International Conflict; III. The Revolt of the English Colonies. The keynote is expansion. The spread of civilization in America has been presented against a broad European background. Not only colonial beginnings but colonial growth has been traced. This method accounts for the development of all geographical sections, and shows the relation of each section to the history of the continent as a whole. When thus presented the early history of Massachusetts, of Georgia, of Arkansas, of Illinois, or of California is no longer merely local history, but is an integral part of the general story. The colonies of the different nations are treated, in so far as practicable, in the chronological order of their development, the desire being to give a correct view of the time sequence in the development of the different regions.A principal aim of the authors has been to make the book comprehensive. The activities of the Dutch and Swedes on the Atlantic mainland are given a large setting in both Europe and the New World. The account of French expansion in North America has been extended beyond the conventional presentation to embrace the West Indies, the founding of Louisiana, and the advance of the French pioneers across the Mississippi and up its tributaries, and up the Saskatchewan to the Rocky Mountains. The story of English expansion embraces not only the thirteen colonies which revolted, but also the Bermudas, the West Indies, Hudson Bay, Canada, and the Floridas. The treatment of the new British possessions between 1763 and 1783 aims to present in one view the story of the expansion of the whole English frontier, from Florida to Hudson Bay. The Spanish colonies of North America, in particular, have been accorded a more adequate treatment than is usual in textbooks. To writers of United States history the Spaniards have appeared to be mere explorers. Students of American history in

Rim of Christendom

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/rim-of-christendom...
"This re-issued biography recounts [Kino's] work with loving detail and with an accuracy that has survived slight amendments. Its accompanying plates, maps, and bibliography enhance a text that should find a place in every serious library.&qu

The Aboriginal Population of Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California (Illustrated)

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-aboriginal-population-o...
The following pages have a twofold purpose. First, there is extended to new territory an analysis of aboriginal population and ecology in California which has already encompassed the San Joaquin Valley (Cook, 1955) and the north coast (Cook, 1956). The area treated here is a portion of that occupied by the Costanoan linguistic division, which extended from San Francisco Bay throughout the interior ranges and along the coast as far south as the latitude of Salinas and Monterey. However, in view of the many accounts which have been written concerning the settlement of coastal California and the establishment of the missions, it seems preferable to devote attention almost exclusively to one restricted region and to deal with this as exhaustively as possible. The area selected embraces the east shore of San Francisco Bay and its hinterland, including what is now Alameda and Contra Costa counties. It is quite true that some of the tribal groups inhabiting this territory may not have been members of the Costanoan stock. On the other hand, in their relation both to the native environment and to the invading white man their activity conformed in all important ways to that of their bona fide Costanoan neighbors. Hence it is proper to treat all the aborigines in the area on a common basis. Second, emphasis has been placed upon setting forth in detail sources of knowledge. There are a number of documents describing conditions in the East Bay from 1770 to 1820. Certain of these, such as the Crespi-Fages and the Font-Anza diaries, have been made available in excellent translations, particularly by Herbert E. Bolton, and although they must be examined and analyzed with care, only a few passages need to be reproduced verbatim. Other documents, some of them of considerable general interest, are almost unknown, not only to students of ethnography, but also to many others concerned with preconquest and early colonial California. Among these may be mentioned the Cañizares exploration
[1]