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Ambition and Delight

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/ambition-and-delight-1...
Henry Bournes scientific career spanned four decades of rapidly expanding progress in experimental biology, accelerated by the DNA revolution of the 1980s. Ambition and Delight shows how the unique personalities, joys, and sorrows of individual sc

Ambition and Delight

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/ambition-and-delight...
Henry Bourne's scientific career spanned four decades of rapidly expanding progress in experimental biology, accelerated by the DNA revolution of the 1980s. Ambition and Delight shows how the unique personalities, joys, and sorrows of individual scientists shape their science. Their discoveries are driven by warm cooperation and painful competition, combined with the viscerally satisfying delight of solving nature's puzzles.

The Revolutionary Period in Europe

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-revolutionary-period-in...
THE close of the Seven Years' War brought only a lull in the great conflicts of the eighteenth century, and yet for a time men seemed less influenced by dynastic quarrels, and their attention was centered upon questions of social and political rec

The Revolutionary Period in Europe

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-revolutionary-period-in...
THE close of the Seven Years' War brought only a lull in the great conflicts of the eighteenth century, and yet for a time men seemed less influenced by dynastic quarrels, and their attention was centered upon questions of social and political rec

The Revolutionary Period in Europe

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-revolutionary-period-in...
THE close of the Seven Years' War brought only a lull in the great conflicts of the eighteenth century, and yet for a time men seemed less influenced by dynastic quarrels, and their attention was centered upon questions of social and political reconstruction. The policies of rulers were affected by these newer interests. They tried to make an end of crying abuses, or at least to simplify their administrative systems and to remove troublesome obstacles to the exercise of their authority. In the last years of the century the timid plans of monarchical reform in France were thrust aside by a popular revolution which aimed to reorganize society according to the principle of equality. The same principle of reorganization was carried beyond the ancient frontiers of France when war broke out and victorious French armies sought to enlarge the borders of the nation or to impose the national institutions upon dependent peoples. Before the period closed with the downfall of Napoleon and the settlement of 1815, these two forces of monarchical reform and revolutionary action had worked many changes in the structure of European society. No brief description of the characteristic features of the old régime can be made altogether satisfactory, because within the limits of a single country, or even of a province, there existed such baffling diversity. Although the proportions of truth are difficult to fix, the impression grows irresistible that the classifications of men in the eighteenth century were outworn, rigid, and unfair, and that those who labored on the farm or in the shop were seriously hampered by restrictions laid upon them by law and custom. When Rousseau declared in 1762 that "Man is born free and is everywhere in chains," the second part of his statement was sufficiently exact in the economic and the larger social sense. The population of Europe was still mainly rural and its principal occupation was agriculture. Nine-tenths of the French people lived in the country o

The Revolutionary Period in Europe

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-revolutionary-period-in...
THE close of the Seven Years' War brought only a lull in the great conflicts of the eighteenth century, and yet for a time men seemed less influenced by dynastic quarrels, and their attention was centered upon questions of

The Revolutionary Period in Europe

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-revolutionary-period-in...
THE close of the Seven Years' War brought only a lull in the great conflicts of the eighteenth century, and yet for a time men seemed less influenced by dynastic quarrels, and their attention was centered upon questions of social and political reconstruction. The policies of rulers were affected by these newer interests. They tried to make an end of crying abuses, or at least to simplify their administrative systems and to remove troublesome obstacles to the exercise of their authority. In the last years of the century the timid plans of monarchical reform in France were thrust aside by a popular revolution which aimed to reorganize society according to the principle of equality. The same principle of reorganization was carried beyond the ancient frontiers of France when war broke out and victorious French armies sought to enlarge the borders of the nation or to impose the national institutions upon dependent peoples. Before the period closed with the downfall of Napoleon and the settlement of 1815, these two forces of monarchical reform and revolutionary action had worked many changes in the structure of European society. No brief description of the characteristic features of the old régime can be made altogether satisfactory, because within the limits of a single country, or even of a province, there existed such baffling diversity. Although the proportions of truth are difficult to fix, the impression grows irresistible that the classifications of men in the eighteenth century were outworn, rigid, and unfair, and that those who labored on the farm or in the shop were seriously hampered by restrictions laid upon them by law and custom. When Rousseau declared in 1762 that "Man is born free and is everywhere in chains," the second part of his statement was sufficiently exact in the economic and the larger social sense. The population of Europe was still mainly rural and its principal occupation was agriculture. Nine-tenths of the French people lived in the country o

A History of Mediaeval and Modern Europe

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/a-history-of-mediaeval-and-...
The Pergamum Collection publishes books history has long forgotten. We transcribe books by hand that are now hard to find and out of print.

British Racing Motors

https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/british-racing-motor...
British Racing Motors (BRM) was a British Formula One motor racing team. Founded in 1945 and based in the market town of Bourne in Lincolnshire, it participated from 1950 to 1977, competing in 197 grands prix and winning seventeen. BRM won the constructors' title in 1962 when its driver Graham Hill became world champion. In 1963, 1964, 1965 and 1971, BRM came second in the constructors' competition.

Beloved Community

https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/beloved-community...
The "Young American" critics - Randolph Bourne, Van Wyck Brooks, Waldo Frank, and Lewis Mumford - are well known as central figures in the Greenwich Village "Little Renaissance" of the 1910s and in the postwar debates about American culture and politics. In Beloved Community, Casey Blake considers these intellectuals as a coherant group and assesses the connection between thier cultural criticisms and their attempts to forge a communitarian alternative to liberal and socialist poitics. Blake draws on biography to emphasize the intersection of questions of self, culture, and society in their calls for a culture of "personality" and "self-fulfillment." In contrast to the tendency of previous analyses to separate these critics' cultural and autobiographical writings from their politics, Blake argues that their cultural criticism grew out of a radical vision of self-realization through participation in a democratic culture and polity. He also examines the Young American writers' interpretations of such turn-of-the-century radicals as William Morris, Henry George, John Dewey, and Patrick Geddes and shows that this adversary tradition still offers important insights into contemporary issues in American politics and culture. Beloved Community reestablishes the democratic content of the Young Americans' ideal of "personality" and argues against viewing a monolithic therapeutic culture as the sole successor to a Victorian "culture of character." The politics of selfhood that was so critical to the Young Americans' project has remained a contested terrain throughout the twentieth century.
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