Daniel W. Barefoot PDF: 1 to 10 of 17 results fetched - page 1 [kb]

Zoolz is the only cloud solution that keeps your data even when you disconnect your drives
Now you can translate your PDF documents automatically to dozens of languages.

Piedmont Phantoms

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/piedmont-phantoms-1...
Daniel W. Barefoot's colleagues in the North Carolina General Assembly call him their "resident historian." Now, he's their resident folklorist, too. North Carolina's Haunted Hundred, Barefoot's three-volume series, is a sampler of the di

Seaside Spectres

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/seaside-spectres-1...
Daniel W. Barefoot's colleagues in the North Carolina General Assembly call him their "resident historian." Now, he's their resident folklorist, too. North Carolina's Haunted Hundred, Barefoot's three-volume series, is a sampler of the di

Haints of the Hills

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/haints-of-the-hills-1...
Daniel W. Barefoot's colleagues in the North Carolina General Assembly call him their "resident historian." Now, he's their resident folklorist, too. North Carolina's Haunted Hundred, Barefoot's three-volume series, is a sampler of the di

Spirits of '76

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/spirits-of-76...
Where history abounds, so do ghosts. And thus, the Revolutionary War yielded the first truly "national" ghosts of the United States. Arranged geographically from Maine to Georgia, these 44 full-length stories offer the ghostly lore of the 13 original American colonies, plus Vermont and Maine. The accounts will take you to the 18th-century battlegrounds, homes, public buildings, and other sites where the spirits of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Betsy Ross, Molly Pitcher, and Benedict Arnold, just to name a few, are said to linger. In addition to the 44 stories, Spirits of 76 offers a directory of additional haunted Revolutionary War sites for each geographic area.

Touring South Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/touring-south-carolina-s-re...
Many historians believe the fortunes of the American Patriots during the Revolutionary War turned dramatically on the battlefields of North and South Carolina. This guide travels to such sites in South Carolina as Cowpens, Ninety Siz, Camden, Euta

Piedmont Phantoms

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/piedmont-phantoms...
Daniel W. Barefoots colleagues in the North Carolina General Assembly call him their "resident historian." Now, hes their resident folklorist, too. North Carolinas Haunted Hundred, Barefoots three-volume series, is a sampler of the diverse supernatural history of the Tar Heel State. One story is drawn from each of the states hundred counties. Youll find tales of ghosts, witches, demons, spook lights, unidentified flying objects, unexplained phenomena, and more. Many of the stories have never before been widely circulated in print. Piedmont Phantoms offers 40 tales from the states populous midsection. "Capitol Haunts," the Wake County story, tells of strange doings at the State Capitol-an unoccupied elevator moving from floor to floor, an unseen hand touching a security guard, the sounds of books falling off shelves and barrels rolling down stairs. "Ghostly Legacy of the Swamp Fox," the Robeson County story, introduces the spirits of the traitor who betrayed Revolutionary War general Francis Marion and the Highland Scot girl who made him do it. "The Hunter at the Zoo," the Randolph County story, describes the ghost of the Confederate recruiter who once hunted human prey at what is now North Carolina Zoological Park.

Seaside Spectres

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/seaside-spectres...
North Carolinas Haunted Hundred, Barefoots three-volume series, is a sampler of the diverse supernatural history of the Tar Heel State. One story is drawn from each of the states hundred counties. Youll find tales of ghosts, witches, demons, spook lights, unidentified flying objects, unexplained phenomena, and more. Many of the stories have never before been widely circulated in print. Seaside Spectres contains 33 tales from the states coastal region. In "The Cursed Town," the Beaufort County story, youll read about the curse laid on Bath by an eighteenth-century preacher-a curse from which the town has never recovered. In "Terrors of the Swamp," the Camden County story, youll learn of unexplained happenings in the Great Dismal Swamp-mysterious lights, a ghostly haunting from the American Revolution, and an awful creature called the Dismal Swamp Freak. In "The Fraternity of Death," the New Hanover County tale, youll meet the nineteenth-century cult whose members mocked the Last Supper and died under mysterious circumstances soon afterward, inspiring a story by Robert Louis Stephenson.

Haints of the Hills

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/haints-of-the-hills...
Daniel W. Barefoots colleagues in the North Carolina General Assembly call him their "resident historian." Now, hes their resident folklorist, too. North Carolinas Haunted Hundred, Barefoots three-volume series, is a sampler of the diverse supernatural history of the Tar Heel State. One story is drawn from each of the states hundred counties. Youll find tales of ghosts, witches, demons, spook lights, unidentified flying objects, unexplained phenomena, and more. Many of the stories have never before been widely circulated in print. Haints of the Hills is a collection of twenty-seven tales from the states mountainous west. Youll be chilled to learn of the red-and-white-striped monstrosity that may still inhabit the Valley River at the site the Indians called the "Leech Place," as told in the Cherokee County story, "The Giant Bloodsucker." Youll be warmed by the Christ-like stranger who came to Bat Cave to repair a rift between neighbors, then vanished as mysteriously as he arrived, as revealed in the Henderson County story, "The Carpenter." Youll want to travel the lonely stretch of road in Avery County where locals have witnessed the spirit of Captain Robert Sevier, the seven-foot-tall hero of the American Revolution, as laid out in "The Long Trek Home."

Haunted Halls of Ivy

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/haunted-halls-of-ivy...
If youre touring Flagler College in historic St. Augustine, look for an old man in a straw hat who wanders away from your group. He is Henry Flagler, railroad magnate, co-owner of Stanford Oil, and perhaps the man most responsible for the Florida boom. He built the spectacular, 540-room, Moorish revival palace that now houses his namesake college. And he died back in 1913.The glow around the door of the unoccupied room on the third floor is the spirit of Henry Flaglers second wife. The phantom footsteps on the marble stairs to the mezzanine are the wraith of his third wife. The woman in black beckoning from the fourth floor is the ghost of his mistress, said to be imprisoned there. Haunted Halls of Ivy contains 39 supernatural tales from colleges and universities throughout the South. Some of the regions oldest, largest, and most famous institutions are represented here, as are smaller, well-respected schools.

General Robert F. Hoke

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/general-robert-f-hoke...
Neglected by modern historians, Robert F. Hoke was a towering figure in his time. Mustered into Confederate service as a second lieutenant in April 1861, he was a major within five months, a lieutenant colonel within nine months, a colonel within sixteen months, a brigadier general within two years, and a major general within three years-becoming, at age twenty-six, the youngest Southern officer of that rank in the Civil War. Of the 125,000 men his state contributed to the Confederate cause, it was Hoke who was called "the North Carolina Lee" and "the most distinguished soldier in North Carolina." In a face-to-face meeting after the war, U.S. Grant admitted that Hoke had administered "the worst drubbing I ever got," at Cold Harbor. He fought in nearly every significant battle in the Eastern theater-Gaines' Mill, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Plymouth, Petersburg, Richmond, Cold Harbor, Fort Fisher, Bentonville. He witnessed the first Confederate casualty at Bethel and provided the rear guard as Joseph E. Johnston met Sherman at Bennett Farm to arrange the surrender. Back home, Hoke hitched his war-horse to a plow and quietly set about rebuilding the South, a cause that later inspired him to leadership positions in industry. A private man, he declined every major honor offered him by North Carolinians, including the governorship. He rarely spoke about the war-especially about his most notorious claim to fame, the still-disputed rumor that he was picked as Lee's successor should anything ever happen to the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia. The personification of reserve, Hoke was once described thus: "Get you a hero, and I give you General Robert F. Hoke. as an ideal in peace and war."

Touring North Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/touring-north-carolina-s-re...
"The story of how thirteen diverse colonies were able to defeat an invading army of the best soldiers in the world serves to inspire people around the globe more than two hundred years later," writes Daniel W. Barefoot. No colony played a greater role than North Carolina. In 1766, Cape Fear Patriots offered the first armed resistance to Royal authority in the colonies. In Alamance County in 1771, Regulators clashed with the governor's troops in what some consider the Revolution's first battle. At Charlotte in 1775, citizens crafted what was perhaps the colonies' first declaration of independence. In 1776, the enactment of the Halifax Resolves made North Carolina the first colony to instruct its Continental Congress delegates to vote for independence. And the list goes on. The fourteen tours in this book tell the story of Revolutionary War North Carolina at the places where events occurred-at the homes of participants, on the ground where battles were fought, at the graves of men and women who sacrificed for freedom. From the coast to the frontier, travelers will meet both the august-men like Nathanael Greene, William R. Davie, and William Hooper-and the colorful-people like Banastre Tarleton, Ben Cleveland, and "Jennie Bahn" McNeill.

Touring South Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/touring-south-carolina-s-re...
The names from Revolutionary War South Carolina are some of the most famous in United States military history. Francis Marion, the "Swamp Fox," ran the British ragged in the Low Country. Thomas Sumter, the "Gamecock," was the headstrong, controversial general of the Piedmont. Andrew Pickens, the "Fighting Elder," kept partisan spirit alive in the Upcountry. The young Andrew Jackson, "Old Hickory," endured wartime tragedy to find the indomitable character that would carry him to the presidency. With a little help from friends such as Nathanael Greene and Daniel Morgan, these warriors fought for liberty against Redcoats like Banastre Tarleton and Torries like Bloody Bill Cunningham at places as renowned as the men themselves-Cowpens, Camden, Kings Mountain, Ninety Six, Sullivan's Island. The 21 tours in this book tell about Revolutionary War South Carolina at the sites where events occurred-at the homes of participants, on battlefields, at the graves of men and women who sacrificed for freedom. South Carolinians maintain that their home saw more Revolutionary War action than any other colony-over 200 battles and skirmishes. Readers will quickly perceive the truth behind the Palmetto State's claim of being the "Battleground of Freedom."

Let Us Die Like Brave Men

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/let-us-die-like-brave-men...
Private Stringfellow of Houston of Missouri was aiding in the Confederate defense when he was badly wounded. His captain thought the young man dead as he was being borne from the field-until he heard a voice from the stretcher: "No, Captain, they have not killed me; they have just shot out my eye, and when I get back from the hospital I can shoot that much faster, as I wont have to shut it."Stonewall Jacksons last recorded words were more poetic. His amputated left arm had already been buried in its own grave following his wounding at Chancellorsville. The Confederate nation awaited news of Jacksons fate as he lay at nearby Guineys Station in May 1863. "Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of trees," he said at the last. Let Us Die Like Brave Men tells the stories behind the dying words of 52 warriors who fell for the Southern cause. It includes soldiers from every Confederate state and gives equal play to men high-ranking and obscure. A few were not even part of the military. For example, James F. Jackson was a boxer and former militiaman who heard a Yankee colonel proclaim, "Behold my trophy," upon tearing down the Stars and Bars in Alexandria, Virginia. Jackson nodded at the shotgun in his own hands and coolly replied, "Behold mine."Though the men in this book fell tragically, their voices continue to speak from beyond the grave. Their courage in the face of death serves as an uplifting example to all Americans who cherish the ideals of bravery, self-sacrifice, and duty.

Touring the Backroads of North Carolina's Lower Coast

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/touring-the-backroads-of-no...
For those familiar with the story of "Brad's Drink"-known today as Pepsi-Cola-North Carolina's lower coast needs no introduction. People of more recent vintage may remember headless Joe Baldwin, the Lumina, the Ghost Fleet of Wilmington, Hurricane Hazel, and the Fort Fisher hermit. Historians have remarked on the irony that Masonboro Island-perhaps the first piece of American coast written about by a European-is now deserted. North Carolina's lower coast is not bothered by such contradictions. It is home to pristine settings like Cape Lookout and Hammocks Beach State Park, historical treasures like Fort Macon, Beaufort, Wilmington, and New Bern's Tryon Palace, and popular tourist spots like the Crystal Coast, Pleasure Island, and the Battleship North Carolina. The 13 tours in this book introduce the sights and history of the lower coast. Those visitors who begin in the north with the ferry to Portsmouth village and partake of the golf-cart ride around Bald Head Island may well find themselves all the way south in Calabash, lining up for dinner with the rest of the crowd.

Touring the Backroads of North Carolina's Upper Coast

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/touring-the-backroads-of-no...
Depending on your perspective, the unique geography of North Carolina's upper coast is either a blessing or a curse. The pirate Blackbeard loved the area for its countless hideaways. Shippers feared it for the deadly shoals of the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Entrepreneurs grew frustrated with its shallow sounds and changeable inlets and established major ports elsewhere. That geography may have been bad business in years past, but it is a boon to modern-day visitors, who enjoy a coastline relatively unspoiled by development. People know North Carolina's upper coast for the Outer Banks, the Lost Colony, the Wright brothers, the Great Dismal Swamp, and the classic lighthouses at Currituck Beach, Bodie Island, Cape Hatteras, and Ocracoke. They are probably less familiar with such treasures as Edenton, Somerset Place, Oriental, the nation's original Washington, and Corolla, with its herd of wild ponies. Covering the famous and the obscure alike, the 11 tours in this volume will introduce readers to the history and lore of an unforgettable place.

Hark the Sound of Tar Heel Voices

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/hark-the-sound-of-tar-heel-...
"What is it that binds us to place as to no other?" Charles Kuralt famously asked at the bicentennial of the first public university in the New World. Hark the Sound of Tar Heel Voices provides 220 years worth of answers, in the very words of the men and women who created and nurtured UNC-Chapel Hill. Readers will hear from William R. Davie, who, legend has it, napped under the landmark poplar that bears his name, as well as from Hinton James, who walked from Wilmington to become UNCs first student. Theyll hear from a witness to the Yankee occupation of the campus and from the lady whose pen saved the university during Reconstruction. Theyll hear from early female and black students and from those who weathered the 1960s.Decade by decade, campus icons like Proff Koch, Frank Porter Graham, Dean Smith, and William C. Friday have their say. So do illustrious alumni ranging from Zeb Vance to Thomas Wolfe to Andy Griffith to Phil Ford. So does even notorious UNC critic Jesse Helms. Perhaps most entertaining are the off-beat narratives from people like the early professor who tried to discipline students for stealing horses and hurling furniture at faculty, the cheerleader responsible for the embarrassing one-time basketball appearance of UNC Rameses, and the future chancellor who didnt graduate on time because he flunked the swimming test. Here for the first time is a collection of personal accounts from the people who transformed a picturesque wooded hill into a world-famous university.

The Waco Kid(s)

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-waco-kid-s...
Growing up in a warm weather city is one of the best things a child could possibly want. I went barefoot most of the time and when school beckoned, I sadly had to encase my happy feet in shoes. I remember rain; wonderful rain that left puddles in the soft sandy loam that was the street in front of my house. I would go out when the rains stopped and sit on the curb holding handfuls of the sweet smelling moist earth to my face. The scent of fresh cut grass came in second best. I inhaled the scent of Waco. I remember the Cotton Palace. Waco is in the heart of cotton country. A fair was held once a year and I would wander up and down watching snake charmers, dancing girls, strong men and of course, cotton candy. A large machine filled with wonderful toys was there for 5 cents to manipulate a claw and if luck was with you, you were a winner of some wondrous object. The only object I ever snared was a pencil clip and I remember that distinctly. I remember Juan. He sold tamales out of a box hung by a leather strap around his neck. The inside of the box was lined with shiny metal. The smell and taste of those steamy tamales still makes me sigh with pleasure. I remember W. Lee O'Daniels and his hillbilly band. He was running for governor and the crowd loved him and his music; he became governor. I remember downtown, Goldstein, Miguel - the largest department store in town. It had a small café that served blue plate specials for 25 cents and just about everything else you wanted to buy. The best place of all was the ice cream parlor "Palace of Sweets" long marble counter, ice cream chairs and tables for the big people and the little people. I remember walking with my mother on summer nights on long strolls past Baylor University, the oldest college in Texas, which has the world's largest collection of the works of Robert Browning. I remember going for ice-cream cones with my brother one day a week when cones were two for a nickel. I would slowly savor
[1] 2Next