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The Future of the Internet--And How to Stop It

https://www.amazon.com/Future-Internet-How-Stop-ebook/dp/B00...
This extraordinary book explains the engine that has catapulted the Internet from backwater to ubiquity—and reveals that it is sputtering precisely because of its runaway success. With the unwitting help
Published by: Yale University Press | Publication date: 04/14/2008
Kindle book details: Kindle Edition, 356 pages

For Fun and Profit: A History of the Free and Open Source Software Revolution (History of Computing)

https://www.amazon.com/Fun-Profit-Software-Revolution-Comput...
In the 1980s, there was a revolution with far-reaching consequences -- a revolution to restore software freedom. In the early 1980s, after decades of making source code available with programs, most programmers ceased sharing code freely. A band of revolutionaries, self-described "hackers," challenged this new norm by building operating systems with source code that could be freely shared. In For Fun and Profit, Christopher Tozzi offers an account of the free and open source software (FOSS) revolution, from its origins as an obscure, marginal effort by a small group of programmers to the widespread commercial use of open source software today. Tozzi explains FOSS's historical trajectory, shaped by eccentric personalities -- including Richard Stallman and Linus Torvalds -- and driven both by ideology and pragmatism, by fun and profit.Tozzi examines hacker culture and its influence on the Unix operating system, the reaction to Unix's commercialization, and the history of early Linux development. He describes the commercial boom that followed, when companies invested billions of dollars in products using FOSS operating systems; the subsequent tensions within the FOSS movement; and the battles with closed source software companies (especially Microsoft) that saw FOSS as a threat. Finally, Tozzi describes FOSS's current dominance in embedded computing, mobile devices, and the cloud, as well as its cultural and intellectual influence.
Published by: The MIT Press | Publication date: 08/04/2017
Kindle book details: Kindle Edition, 335 pages

Access Controlled: The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace (Information Revolution and Global Politics)

https://www.amazon.com/Access-Controlled-Cyberspace-Informat...
Internet filtering, censorship of Web content, and online surveillance are increasing in scale, scope, and sophistication around the world, in democratic countries as well as in authoritarian states. The first generation of Internet controls consisted largely of building firewalls at key Internet gateways; China's famous "Great Firewall of China" is one of the first national Internet filtering systems. Today the new tools for Internet controls that are emerging go beyond mere denial of information. These new techniques, which aim to normalize (or even legalize) Internet control, include targeted viruses and the strategically timed deployment of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, surveillance at key points of the Internet's infrastructure, take-down notices, stringent terms of usage policies, and national information shaping strategies. Access Controlled reports on this new normative terrain. The book, a project from the OpenNet Initiative (ONI), a collaboration of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk Centre for International Studies, Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and the SecDev Group, offers six substantial chapters that analyze Internet control in both Western and Eastern Europe and a section of shorter regional reports and country profiles drawn from material gathered by the ONI around the world through a combination of technical interrogation and field research methods.
Published by: The MIT Press | Publication date: 04/02/2010
Kindle book details: Kindle Edition, 634 pages

Access Contested: Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian Cyberspace (Information Revolution and Global Politics)

https://www.amazon.com/Access-Contested-Resistance-Cyberspac...
A daily battle for rights and freedoms in cyberspace is being waged in Asia. At the epicenter of this contest is China--home to the world's largest Internet population and what is perhaps the world's most advanced Internet censorship and surveillance regime in cyberspace. Resistance to China's Internet controls comes from both grassroots activists and corporate giants such as Google. Meanwhile, similar struggles play out across the rest of the region, from India and Singapore to Thailand and Burma, although each national dynamic is unique. Access Contested, the third volume from the OpenNet Initiative (a collaborative partnership of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs, the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and the SecDev Group in Ottawa), examines the interplay of national security, social and ethnic identity, and resistance in Asian cyberspace, offering in-depth accounts of national struggles against Internet controls as well as updated country reports by ONI researchers.The contributors examine such topics as Internet censorship in Thailand, the Malaysian blogosphere, surveillance and censorship around gender and sexuality in Malaysia, Internet governance in China, corporate social responsibility and freedom of expression in South Korea and India, cyber attacks on independent Burmese media, and distributed-denial-of-service attacks and other digital control measures across Asia.
Published by: The MIT Press | Publication date: 09/30/2011
Kindle book details: Kindle Edition, 431 pages

Ten Years of Code: A Reasessment of Lawrence Lessig's Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace (Cato Unbound Book 52009)

https://www.amazon.com/Ten-Years-Code-Reasessment-Cyberspace...
Lawrence Lessig's Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace is widely regarded as one of the foundational texts of Internet law. A book this important will always draw both defenders and critics, and Lessig himself has gone as far as to produce a free, open-source revision of the text, entitled Code Version 2.0. (We'd be remiss if we failed to point out that Lessig helped pioneer the very idea of "open source" distribution.)In the original Code, Lessig was at pains to distance himself from cyberlibertarians; although he championed a relatively permissive regulatory regime for the Internet, Lessig insisted on the importance of politics in shaping this new area of human action. He warned that without carefully constructed regulations, corporate and other special interests stood to capture the online experience — with results that would be anything but free. His provocative final chapter was entitled "What Declan Doesn't Get"; it called out journalist Declan McCullagh as just the type of over-optimistic cyberlibertarian who didn't appreciate these growing threats.In 2009, Code turns ten years old, and it is just as relevant as ever. It seemed fitting, then, to invite Declan McCullagh to help re-assess what Lessig and others were predicting at the time. We've invited Internet law experts Jonathan Zittrain and Adam Thierer to comment as well; each has a somewhat different perspective on the future of the Internet and how best to preserve its free and creative character. And the discussion wouldn't be complete without Lawrence Lessig himself, who will respond to his critics and offer his own assessment of where things stand, ten years after his remarkable book.
Published by: Cato Institute | Publication date: 05/04/2009
Kindle book details: Kindle Edition, 42 pages

Access Denied: The Practice and Policy of Global Internet Filtering (Information Revolution and Global Politics)

https://www.amazon.com/Access-Denied-Filtering-Information-R...
Many countries around the world block or filter Internet content, denying access to information that they deem too sensitive for ordinary citizens -- most often about politics, but sometimes relating to sexuality, culture, or religion. Access Denied documents and analyzes Internet filtering practices in more than three dozen countries, offering the first rigorously conducted study of an accelerating trend. Internet filtering takes place in more than three dozen states worldwide, including many countries in Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. Related Internet content-control mechanisms are also in place in Canada, the United States and a cluster of countries in Europe. Drawing on a just-completed survey of global Internet filtering undertaken by the OpenNet Initiative (a collaboration of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, the Oxford Internet Institute at Oxford University, and the University of Cambridge) and relying on work by regional experts and an extensive network of researchers, Access Denied examines the political, legal, social, and cultural contexts of Internet filtering in these states from a variety of perspectives. Chapters discuss the mechanisms and politics of Internet filtering, the strengths and limitations of the technology that powers it, the relevance of international law, ethical considerations for corporations that supply states with the tools for blocking and filtering, and the implications of Internet filtering for activist communities that increasingly rely on Internet technologies for communicating their missions. Reports on Internet content regulation in forty different countries follow, with each two-page country profile outlining the types of content blocked by category and documenting key findings.ContributorsRoss Anderson, Malcolm Birdling, Ronald Deibert, Robert Faris, Vesselina Haralampieva [as per Rob Faris], Steven Murdoch, Helmi Noman, John Palfrey, Rafal Rohozinski, Mary Rundle, Nart Villeneuve, Stephanie Wang, Jonathan Zittrain
Published by: The MIT Press | Publication date: 01/25/2008
Kindle book details: Kindle Edition, 472 pages
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